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DIY : Honda Civic 1987-2000 Crack Steering Boot/Dust Seal Replacement

Posted in My Automotive Life | No Comments »

 I replace this dust seal before, using the OEM Honda, but, I think it is not durable as original, I mean the old one, this is a little ‘bit disappointed’…

Check for the leaking, if your power steering reservoir runs low, no matter how frequently you top up the fluid, you should check entire power steering system, there must be leakage somewhere. Check the steering gearbox (steering rack system), pump, reservoir, pump outlet line (high pressure), low pressure hoses and pipe. Click here if you want to rebuild the entire steering rack.

Remove the cotton pin.

I highly recommend you to using ball joint remover instead of using hammer or etc.

Marking the alignment point with the tape to make sure the wheel alignment didn’t goes so far, I also note the threads, remove the boot band and the tube clamp.

Remove the tie-rod end, it’s tough and stubborn sometime…

Remove the crack dust seal. It’s a good time to re-grease  rack end ball joint and steering rack gear, my old grease is melting, should put the high temp grease…

Insert the new dust seal, reassembly all back together using reverse step.

This is the boring maintenance that I ever do….

DIY : Honda Civic/Integra Distributor Oil Seal and O-Ring Replacement

Posted in My Automotive Life | 4 Comments »

I think, I frequently write about leaking oil, yeah, this is another story…

Once upon a time, the old O-Ring become very old until he didn’t care about what goes around anymore…

DISCLAIMER: I can not say this is the best or safest way to do. I am not
responsible for any thing you damage, or what ever harm you cause to
yourself or others. This is how I did it and it worked for me.

Some oily below the distributor? Sometime, this old O-Ring playing tricks on you, until you thought, your head is leaking! (I mean, your engine head). There will be oil around the corner, where the block mate with the head, this is good replacement after you replacing the camshaft plug and VTEC solenoid gasket.

This procedure is specifically for Honda Tec distributor, other brand may have same or different procedure. So, the first step is to remove the 2-P connector from the distributor.

I didn’t remove the spark plug cables for easy installation. Remove three distributor cap bolts.

Marking the related position between distributor and cylinder head, to make sure the ignition timing didn’t out of spec during installation.

Then, remove the distributor mounting bolts, then remove the distributor from the cylinder head. As you could see the picture below, where is the leaking point and O-Ring that responsible for this problem location (external leak). If you just want to change this O-Ring only, ignore the entire procedure below, just make sure everything is clean and install the new O-Ring.

The consequence.

To prevent 180° out of time when install back the distributor end, mark the center shaft and distributor end. Note : The lugs on the end of the distributor and its mating grooves in the camshaft are both offset to eliminate the possibility of installing the distributor 180° out of time.

Turn circlip remove point to the pin hole, flat screw driver is good enough to remove this circlip.

Turn the distributor ignition rotor until you see the screw that hold the rotor, remove the ignition rotor and leak cover.

Remove three screws (cream color circle) that hold the ignition control module (ICM), TDC/CKP/CYP sensors and two screws (black color circle) that hold the ignition coil.

Remove the wires grommet.

Optional : Remove the two last TDC/CKP/CYP sensors for more work space. TheTDC/CKP/CYP sensors have a small bump on the bottom that fits into corresponding holes in the distributor case so that the sensors will only fit in one place and can’t be adjusted.

My oil seal seem ok, there’s no major leak, but, it’s a good practice to change it since it run over 100k.

This is what the entire system look like.

Pull out the oil seal using the flat screw driver, it should be easy.

Cleaning time! I clean using silicone spray. Before:

After:

There are 2 type OEM Honda distributor O-Ring common type. The dealer tell me that OEM Honda distributor O-Ring make from viton material, that why the price is high that normal rubber type (about 4 times!).

Comparison.

Install the new oil seal, make sure the seal seat properly, I using 14mm socket to slowly push it down.

Install back all together reverse of removal, install the new O-Ring, and don’t forget the marking points that I mentioned before or your engine won’t start.

Install the distributor on the cylinder head,  don’t forget the ignition timing marking point! That all, wait for the next chapter of the leaking oil story (I hope not!).

DIY : Honda Civic 1987-2000 Main Rear Trailing Arm Bushing Replacement

Posted in My Automotive Life | 3 Comments »

So, this is time for ‘big buddy’, main rear trailing arm bushing, stress by stress, time by time, he need retirement…

Long time ago, Honda doesn’t supply trailing arm bushing separately, they sell entirely trailing arm set! When need to replace? Should check it after 50 000km, but it depend on how you handle your car, modification and the road condition. These bushings are responsible for rear stability, so make sure it always takes a good responsible!

DISCLAIMER: I can not say this is the best or safest way to do. I am not
responsible for any thing you damage, or what ever harm you cause to
yourself or others. This is how I did it and it worked for me.

Some prefer to use Honda/Acura trailing arm bushing removal/extractor (refer the picture below), the benefits is, only need to remove several bolts and you can remove and replace the bushing with the trailing arm still in the car, save your time, the con is, this special tool is a little bit expensive and you need to wait for a long time to use this secret weapon again, except you are full-time car mechanic. And other extremely technique is, to used hammer! I witness this on YouTube. But I prefer to remove entirely trailing arm and take to the machine shop to press the bush.

This schematic take from service manual show where exactly the trailing arm doing the job, the biggest and most powerful arm! Show also the torque spec.

Honestly, this maintenance is very easy and straight forward job, our mission is to remove/deattach anything that connects/attach the trailing arm to the body, necessary only, take the first step, remove the caliper shield.

And next is to remove the parking brake cable, remove the lock pin, clevis pin and clip.

Next step is to remove the brake caliper, only two caliper bracket bolts (orange circle), that all.

Remove any bolt that attach brake hose at the trailing arm.

Remove the compensator arm, one side bolt only…I remove bolt that connect compensator arm to the body, yeah, this is sure will mess with the toe alignment, but it more easier to remove, because the are lot of work space for me. Just do the marking point.

Then, remove the upper arm self-locking bolt.

Remove the trailing arm bushing bolts.

Toing! Remove parking brake cable bolt that attaches to the trailing arm.

And lastly, remove the lower arm self-locking bolt. Easy and straight forward right? Like my texts.

Men shopping time! I recommend you to measure your original old bushing diameter, there are two type of diameter for OEM Honda,

The small diameter bushing is part number 52385-SR3-000. It’s outside diameter is 3.170 inches (80.52mm)

The large diameter bushing is part number 52385-SK7-N02. It’s outside diameter is 3.352 inches (85.14mm)

Goodbye old buddy, take a deep rest, please don’t show your sadness face to me.

The complete trailing arm set.

The oldest one is more thick than the new one, I wonder why Honda reduce it size. From physically and design, the old one look like more rigid and will not allow minor movement, the new one is more flexibility and maybe didn’t keep hard stress and more comfort riding, maybe less for duration and durability, who’s know? There is one another  important factor to consider, the material it self. So, time will speak…

But, there a are another option, aftermarket part! This text I copy from my previous post –> There are many topic people around the world discuss about bushing, but what take my attention is, which one material is better, OEM rubber or aftermarket polyurethane (PU)? For my opinion, each other have their own advantage and disadvantage, polyurethane will give extremely durable, maintain steering geometry, enhance handling & ride characteristic and many more than stock rubber, but it will cost you twice or tree! Two friend of mine change fully bushing to polyurethane and they say there is no problem, the only problem is price,  I also read about people experience with  PU, almost say, it’s too hard for daily driving or family car, and sometime make squeaking noise, and have to re-grease with special grease, there are many brand out there, my friend recommend me Superpro bushing, I also read people choose hard rubber than poly and OEM rubber, for me OEM rubber bush is always fine,  it depend on what your car for, mine is only for daily and street driving, so, I will stick with OEM rubber bush.<– End of copy

Also, you have to consider, about total motion that a suspension has to move through!

Before pressing, measure and remember the correct position (which side is above and below) of the old one. Some prefer to mark when the arm still in the car, on the wheels and sitting on the ground if you lowered the car, to prevent constant pre-load twist that could lead to early breakage because of the bush will twist a little degree from the standard setting, that the great point, but for me, I need to consider about my coilover, how much I lowered my car, road condition (bump and crack), the passengers, the motion of cornering and the bush design it self to handle all the motion, because it dynamically, so I will stick with the natural position.

This is the great chance if you want to replace the compensator arm.

After installing the new one.

Reassembly all back together using reverse step, install the compensator arm bolts close the the the original position (toe adjustment), but, I highly recommend you to do wheel alignment, because wear bush alignment of cause not to match the new one. This procedure also could be use to converted from drum brake to disk brake, just replace the hand brake cable.

After test drive : Improve hard braking, cornering and can handle bumping road better.

I snap this picture after I do alignment and run for 100km, while the car still on the wheels, sitting on the ground and no driver or passenger load, just want to check the position of my trailing arm bush.

The result, almost the same position when the trailing arm still hanging.

I Build 8 – Creating Webpage/Website Main Body

Posted in My Internet Life | No Comments »

This is where all the main contents goes, either text, animation, images, sound or video, it’s simple to create the main body layout, but a little bit tricky, it should editable, flexible and attractive.

I assume you read my previous  entry

The coding and structure is similar to Header Section  just with a little bit modification, here the CCS code, under the  new title,

/******************************/
/*  MAIN BODY SECTION  */
/******************************/

.Main-body {
    width:664px;
    text-align: left;
    margin: auto;
}

.Contents {
    width:600px;
    top: 230px;
    text-align: justify;
    background-image: url(../Image/Paper.png);
    background-attachment: scroll;
    background-repeat: repeat;    
    font-family: Georgia, “Times New Roman”, Times, serif;
    font-size: 12px;
    line-height: 20px;
    padding: 30px 30px 30px 50px;
    margin: 0 auto auto -15px;
    z-index: 1;
}

Note :

At the margin, I put a -15px for margin-left to adjust the background image position.

background-attachment: – The background-attachment property sets whether a background image is fixed or scrolls with the rest of the page.

background-repeat: – refer to my last CSS entry for more details

padding: – The padding shorthand property sets all the padding properties in one declaration. This property can have from one to four values. Example,

End Note :

And this is the HTML code,

<!– (Main Body) –>

<div class=”Main-body”>
<div style=”position:absolute;”>
<!– TemplateBeginEditable name=”Contents” –>
  <p>In progress, coming soon..</p>
  <!– TemplateEndEditable –></div>
</div>

<!– (Main Body End) –>

To text in, I used MS Office or etc., and paste in the Contents (do not paste at the coding) it’s better.

I think, that’s all for the basic main body, see you in the next entry.

MOMO Steering Wheel Installations

Posted in My Automotive Life | No Comments »

For better handling and stylish, this upgrade is the most, why I choose MOMO? because Honda choose them! MOMO steering wheel is the standard accessories for Honda NSX, Integra DC2/DC5 and Civic EK9 Type-R! The  steering wheel come with the thick leather anatomic grips design, that give you a firm grip and positive steering feel that you just can’t get from the stock wheel. A bit smaller diameter and aluminum material make it weigh half of my standard EG9 steering wheel! Better not to choose the smallest size, it will ruin the daily driving (except you want to feel like driving the go cart).

To install, is straight forward job, unless if you have an air bag, have a little bit tricky! Need suitable steering wheel adapter (steering hubs/boss kits), DC2 and 1992 – 1995 Honda Civic EG are interchangeable.

The standard one.

Remove the center pad and the steering wheel nut, no need a special tool,  enough with the socket and extension, the nut will be fairly tight. Remove the steering wheel by rocking it slightly from side-to-side as you pull steadily with both hands.

Install the steering wheel adapter (steering hubs/boss kits). Be sure the steering wheel shaft engages the turn signal canceling sleeve. Install back the steering wheel nut.

Install the horn button, connect the two wires to the horn button. It doesn’t matter which wire goes to which connector. If there no connector for the ground (body) just touch it at any place at the steering wheel adapter, put the tape or rewiring, etc., as long as it will stick there. Verify the horn operation. Make sure the steering wheel adapter arrow in the center position.

Insert the MOMO steering wheel and the adapter plate.

Secure it with the hex screw and everything is done. Easy right?

The silver spoke match with the dashboard.

Then take the car for a ride and verify that the turn signals shut off properly after making a turn and don’t forget to attack the corner!