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Posts Tagged Rebuild/Repair

DIY : 92-95 Honda Civic Fuel Filter Replacement

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Someone maybe wonder, “fuel filter? I never thought that thing ever exist in my car!”, yes, that thing is not famous as oil filter or air filter, but equivalent important too,  year after year, there can be a fair amount of rust and debris in the fuel tank, some come from the time when you adding fuel, and fuel filter will plugged and the fuel pressure will drop as well, and that’s not sound good right? The filter should be replaced every 2 years or 40 000 km, whichever come first, and it’s a just cheap and simple preventative maintenance.

Disconnected the negative cable from the battery negative terminal.

Put rag or shop towel under and around the fuel filter, hold the banjo bolt with 17mm wrench and remove the service bolt with 12mm wrench, this procedure is to relive fuel pressure.

Remove the banjo bolt and fuel feed pipe from the filter. Remove the fuel filter clamp by removing the clamping bolt (blue circle – refer above picture).

Come from the old filter, this is the reason why…

New fuel filter, come with the washer, install everything back in the reverse order of removal, and done.

DIY : 92-95 Honda Civic Nippondenso Alternator Whining & Carbon Brush & Bearing Replacement

Posted in My Automotive Life | 6 Comments »

When I turn on all heavy load, I mean amp load (air-conditioner, headlights (HI), fog lights, audio system, etc.) the alternator will start make whining noise like my blander machine. Inspection & suspecting;

1. I measure the battery voltage (engine at the normal operating temperature), seem normal, between 13.9 – 15.1 Voltage, depend on the load as long as it doesn’t exceed and below the range (to improve fuel economy, the alternator control system within the PGM-FI ECU changes the voltage generated at the alternator in accordance with the driving conditions). That mean my battery is under charge and voltage regulator is functioning.

2. I didn’t suspect the bearing, worn bearing will whining all the time.

3. Check the belt condition and belt deflection (5-7mm), seem OK.

4. Luckily, I have the spare alternator, take from the car graveyard, make the replacement, no more whining anymore! So, that’s mean, my alternator almost at the dead end, the whining come from electrical noise, the replacement is essential.

This is the step for alternator replacement, disconnect the cable from the battery negative (-) terminal and disconnect the alternator connector from the alternator. Remove the terminal nut and the white wire from the B terminal.

Also, don’t forget to dis-clip the white cable that attach to the alternator body.

Alternative – Make more work space by dis-clip the wire connectors. You will see clearly the adjusting nut.

Remove the adjusting nut and then remove adjusting bolt.

Jack stand the car, remove the left tire and under the alternator, there is alternator through bolt, remove it.

Loosen the belt by moving the alternator and then, remove it. Then carefully take out the alternator.

If you just want to make the new alternator replacement, just install everything back in the reverse order of removal, make sure everything in their place, and make the belting adjustment by adjusting the alternator adjusting bolt. But in my case, I need to refreshing my used alternator by cleaning, replace the bearing and the carbon brush.

At the alternator end cover, remove everything in the blue circle (This is how I use to short my text)

And again. Then remove the voltage regulator, diode and brush holder.

Again…

Inspect the slip rings, not in the bad condition…

Remove the pulley locknut (it is easy if you have an impact wrench/gun) and remove the pulley.

Loosen the rear housing (I used flat screw driver) from drive end housing.

Knock a little bit to loosen the housing.

Tap down the rotor shaft at the solid surface to split the housing, be careful, not too much. I don’t know what to call this method, but it’s work!

Remove the rotor by using the bearing puller.

Polishing the slip rings using small grits sand paper.

Check the continuity between the slip rings and no continuity between slip rings and the rotor or rotor shaft.

New set of carbon brush, make by TRIS Inc. , carbon brushes specialist company from Japan.

The old one still could be use, as long as you could see the company logo , but it is a good practice to replace alternator carbon brush that run over than 200 000 km.

Alternator brushes length : Standard : 10.5mm, service limit : 5.5mm.

Soldering set.

De-soldering.

Alternator brushes length : Standard : 10.5mm

Soldering.

Remove the bearing retainer.

This is how I remove the front bearing, using suitable socket, and hammer it out.

Comparison with the old and the new bearing (KOYO 437 vs NSK 817-101DG8B).

The better procedure to install the bearing is using the press machine.

Install back the bearing retainer.

Comparison with the old and the new bearing (NSK 399 vs NSK 6202DW).

Use the same method from the previous one to remove the old bearing, be careful with the spacer ring.

In my case I am using 27 deep length socket size.

The better procedure to install the bearing is using the press machine.

Insert back the rotor into the big and small bearing housing using hand force.

Using back 27 deep length socket size to cover the slip rings.

Hammer down the rotor shaft until the two halves close together and tighten the four nuts to fasten the casing together.

Install everything back in the reverse order of removal, make sure everything in their place, easy right?

Great link : http://www.rowand.net/shop/tech/alternatorgeneratortheory.htm ,

http://www.eham.net/articles/15113 , http://www.avweb.com/news/maint/182896-1.html

DIY : 92-95 Honda Civic Power Steering Pump Overhaul/Rebuild

Posted in My Automotive Life | 6 Comments »

High pitched whine and leaking at the power steering pump? That only means shaft bearing failure and seals leak. No more wonder anymore, time to rebuild!

Detached power steering pump reservoir tank from bracket and raise it, cover up anything with rag, towel or paper that have probability of contact with oil.

Disconnected outlet hose by remove two bolts (red circle) and undo the clamp on the inlet hose (green circle).

Pinch the inlet hose and remove inlet hose from the pump the put the end of hose into the bottle to drain the oil.

To make your life easier, crack open a few degree (about 5 degree) pump cover bolts (green circle), it’s better to do now than later (after pump out). Remove the belt by loosening adjusting bolt (red circle) and remove the special bolts (black & white circle).

Remove the pump from the engine.

So, this the power steering pump repair kit and NTN bearing.

Remove the pulley by remove the pulley nut. Warning: Pulley nut has left-hand threads, that mean, remove the nut by clockwise. And the nut is PRETTY HARD to remove.

Remove the control valve cap by removing three flange bolts (green circle).

Remove the control valve spring, control valve and O-ring (replace).

Check for wear, burrs, and other damage to the edges of the grooves in the valve.

Remove the inlet joint and O-ring (replace).

Remove the pump cover and O-ring (replace).

Then remove all the inner pieces, remembering how they were placed.

Remove the circlip,

then remove the drive shaft assembly from the pump housing using a hammer, knock carefully at the drive shaft end.

For me, even the bearing still play good (no noisy or excessive play), I will replace it, since it make over 4000 times marathon running and also for peace in mind. Remove by using hammer, better big hammer, don’t be shy, it will pop out, I mean, POP! Then install the new bearing (the quality one please), the plastic side should be facing the threads. And of course, the better procedure is using the press machine.

Install the new oil seal in the pump housing by hand,

then install the pump seal spacer.

Install the pump driver shaft assembly, using hammer and impact deep socket that fit enough into inner diameter, or you will break the plastic cover, and honestly, it will better if you could use the socket that really fit the outer diameter (maybe around 27mm socket that I didn’t have), but the housing is not so tight, hammer it slowly, and of course, once again, the better procedure is using the press machine.

Until the bearing is completely below the circlip groove.

Install the circlip with its tapered side facing out.

Coat the side plate grooves with power steering fluid then insert new O-rings so on for the pump cover.

Install the preload spring and the tallest roller in the pump housing,

set the side plate over the tallest roller and install it on the pump housing with ‘O’ mark facing upward then insert the shortest roller.

Assemble pump rotor to the drive shaft with the ‘O’ mark facing upward, set the 10 vanes in the grooves in the rotor, be sure that round end of the vanes is in contact with the sliding surface of the cam ring.

Set the pump cam ring over the two rollers (don’t worry, the holes have a different diameter) with the ‘O’ mark facing upward.

Align the projection on the pump housing and the projection on the pump cover (blue oval) and tighten the four bolts.

Install the control valve in the reverse order of removal.

Install back the pulley and done!

Replace the outlet hose O-ring.

Install everything back in the reverse order of removal, make sure everything in their place, if there are cracks or any damage evident on the belt, replace it with a new one, turn the adjusting bolts to get the proper belt tension, then re-tighten two special bolts.

Fill the reservoir tank with the new GENUINE HONDA power steering fluid to the upper level mark. Start the engine and run it at fast idle, and then turn the steering from lock-to-lock several times to bleed air from the system. Recheck the fluid level and add some if necessary. DO NOT FILL THE RESERVOIR BEYOND THE UPPER LEVER. Stop the engine and recheck the reflection of the belt, adjusting back if necessary.

Happy no power steering pump leaking days!  

DIY : Honda Civic 1987-2000 Crack Steering Boot/Dust Seal Replacement

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 I replace this dust seal before, using the OEM Honda, but, I think it is not durable as original, I mean the old one, this is a little ‘bit disappointed’…

Check for the leaking, if your power steering reservoir runs low, no matter how frequently you top up the fluid, you should check entire power steering system, there must be leakage somewhere. Check the steering gearbox (steering rack system), pump, reservoir, pump outlet line (high pressure), low pressure hoses and pipe. Click here if you want to rebuild the entire steering rack.

Remove the cotton pin.

I highly recommend you to using ball joint remover instead of using hammer or etc.

Marking the alignment point with the tape to make sure the wheel alignment didn’t goes so far, I also note the threads, remove the boot band and the tube clamp.

Remove the tie-rod end, it’s tough and stubborn sometime…

Remove the crack dust seal. It’s a good time to re-grease  rack end ball joint and steering rack gear, my old grease is melting, should put the high temp grease…

Insert the new dust seal, reassembly all back together using reverse step.

This is the boring maintenance that I ever do….

DIY : Honda Civic/Integra Distributor Oil Seal and O-Ring Replacement

Posted in My Automotive Life | 4 Comments »

I think, I frequently write about leaking oil, yeah, this is another story…

Once upon a time, the old O-Ring become very old until he didn’t care about what goes around anymore…

DISCLAIMER: I can not say this is the best or safest way to do. I am not
responsible for any thing you damage, or what ever harm you cause to
yourself or others. This is how I did it and it worked for me.

Some oily below the distributor? Sometime, this old O-Ring playing tricks on you, until you thought, your head is leaking! (I mean, your engine head). There will be oil around the corner, where the block mate with the head, this is good replacement after you replacing the camshaft plug and VTEC solenoid gasket.

This procedure is specifically for Honda Tec distributor, other brand may have same or different procedure. So, the first step is to remove the 2-P connector from the distributor.

I didn’t remove the spark plug cables for easy installation. Remove three distributor cap bolts.

Marking the related position between distributor and cylinder head, to make sure the ignition timing didn’t out of spec during installation.

Then, remove the distributor mounting bolts, then remove the distributor from the cylinder head. As you could see the picture below, where is the leaking point and O-Ring that responsible for this problem location (external leak). If you just want to change this O-Ring only, ignore the entire procedure below, just make sure everything is clean and install the new O-Ring.

The consequence.

To prevent 180° out of time when install back the distributor end, mark the center shaft and distributor end. Note : The lugs on the end of the distributor and its mating grooves in the camshaft are both offset to eliminate the possibility of installing the distributor 180° out of time.

Turn circlip remove point to the pin hole, flat screw driver is good enough to remove this circlip.

Turn the distributor ignition rotor until you see the screw that hold the rotor, remove the ignition rotor and leak cover.

Remove three screws (cream color circle) that hold the ignition control module (ICM), TDC/CKP/CYP sensors and two screws (black color circle) that hold the ignition coil.

Remove the wires grommet.

Optional : Remove the two last TDC/CKP/CYP sensors for more work space. TheTDC/CKP/CYP sensors have a small bump on the bottom that fits into corresponding holes in the distributor case so that the sensors will only fit in one place and can’t be adjusted.

My oil seal seem ok, there’s no major leak, but, it’s a good practice to change it since it run over 100k.

This is what the entire system look like.

Pull out the oil seal using the flat screw driver, it should be easy.

Cleaning time! I clean using silicone spray. Before:

After:

There are 2 type OEM Honda distributor O-Ring common type. The dealer tell me that OEM Honda distributor O-Ring make from viton material, that why the price is high that normal rubber type (about 4 times!).

Comparison.

Install the new oil seal, make sure the seal seat properly, I using 14mm socket to slowly push it down.

Install back all together reverse of removal, install the new O-Ring, and don’t forget the marking points that I mentioned before or your engine won’t start.

Install the distributor on the cylinder head,  don’t forget the ignition timing marking point! That all, wait for the next chapter of the leaking oil story (I hope not!).