Official Raz Veinz Blogsite

Posts Tagged SO3

SuperPro Lower Arm Bushing

Posted in My Automotive Life | No Comments »

This is the result for my front lower arm bush after 31 078km at the Malaysia road + Tien HA.

The worst!

Did someone put the TNT bomb at my bush?

If your steering doesn’t follow your order, or even small road bump will make your steering lose control, this is may some of the cause, I think I want to take back my last words about polyurethane, even my car focus for daily and street driving, I need to consider about my sport suspension setup and harsh road condition and other variables, so, I need a solid solution (I really mean solid), here the cure, SuperPro bushing.

Repeat this procedure.

I also replace my swaybar bush with superpro.

After test drive : Wow, feel so refresh, car going smooth and rigid at the high RPM, improve cornering. (copy paste from my previous post 😛 just the impression is double) Great design and quality! No squeaking noise at all.

DIY : Honda Civic 1992-1995 Ball Joint Replacement

Posted in My Automotive Life | No Comments »

I think this procedure is similar for Honda Integra DC2, Civic 4th and 6th generation. I divide this post onto 3 parts, by removal sequence.

Part 1 : Lower Arm Ball Joint

  1. Remove the spindle nut – Previous post
  2. Separate the tie-rod end from the knuckle – Previous post
  3. Separate the ball joint from the lower arm – Previous post
  4. Separate the upper arm ball joint from the knuckle – Part 2

Then, remove ball joint from knuckle by first remove the circlip, then press out using pressing machine (machine shop).

Circlip remover.

The new design does’t have circlip…

Press the new one and put everything back together where they are belong except if you want to continue for part 2 and part 3, hold for the tie-rod end only if you want to skip to part 3

Part 2 : Upper Arm Ball Joint

Unfortunately, to remove the civic 5th generation upper arm, first, you need to remove the shock absorber, I think this is the reason why Honda redesign Civic 6th generation upper arm.

Separate the upper arm ball joint from the knuckle, same procedure from Part 1 (step 3).

Remove 4 nuts that hold the upper arm and shock absober.

Remove the damper pinch bolt…

so on with the damper fork bolt

And then you can grand the freedom for the shock absober.

Replacement part, according to my local supplier, there is no more OEM Honda upper arm for my vehicle, similar quality is from Sankei Industry Co.,Ltd. in the 555 trademark.

Made in Japan quality for sure.

Put everything back together.

Don’t forget your cotter-pin!

Part 3 : Steering Rack Ball Joint

Separate the tie-rod end from the knuckle, you can read from my previous post, it’s the same procedure.

Remove the rack end ball joint. (there have special tool to remove this, but I only used 2 big adjustable wrench, one to unscrew the rack end and another to hold the steering rack)

This is why they call it rack end.

Replacement part. Can you spot the difference? Yeah, the new one ball joint housing does’t have place for big wrench.

Alignment marking.

Screw it by hand…

Then tighten the rack end using wrench.

Coat the sliding surface of the rack end with the grease and insert the dust seal.

Don’t forget your tube clamp.

Can you spot the difference? Yeah, the new one made from the gold! (just kidding…)

Install back tie-rod end (refer to my previous post).

And, I don’t know why I put this picture…maybe symbolic for THE END.

 

DIY : OBD 1 to OBD 2 Alternator Plug Converter

Posted in My Automotive Life | No Comments »

Now-days its seem hard to find the B16a OBD1 alternator from the junkyard, luckily, B-series OBD2 alternator is compatible but not just plug and play, there a different type of socket (OBD1 = round, OBD2 = square) and luckily again, I found 5 unit B20b alternator from Honda CRV, take them all! So, the problem is, how to convert it into OBD1 car without cutting any wire? The answer is plug converter! But, unluckily, not available in my place. Give up? no.

Wait! Don’t throw away your broken heart OBD1 alternator, take out the voltage regulator.

and modify into this…with great patiently of course…

With the OBD2 alternator plug that stick at the alternator, I soldered it with the OBD1 voltage regulator socket (don’t forget to check the continuity with the multimeter before soldering) , seal with the epoxy and  cover and secure it with flexible split tubing. Here the outlet diagram.

Tadaa! 

DIY : Honda Civic/Integra 92-00 Condenser Fan Motor Carbon Brushes Replacement

Posted in My Automotive Life | No Comments »

This is could be another good preventive maintenance that we overlooked, after your car run over 150 000km, the condenser fan is very important part for the heat exchange system to help the condenser dissipation heat efficiently from hot compressed gasses supplied by the compressor, if it failed, it may cause idle problem when you turn on the air conditioning system.

First thing is to remove the fan by remove the bolt that hold the fan (blue circle).

Unplug the fan motor socket and remove the few relay (for the space) and remove the bottom right bolt…

and the bottom left side.

I also remove the exhaust manifold heat shield for the space…

and the radiator fan too! (this is a good change to replace radiator fan motor carbon brushes). By removing 4 bolts that attached the fan to the radiator.

To remove the motor from the casing and the fan blade is a piece of cake.

Here we go.

Remove the 3 locking tabs by using chisel or flat screwdriver (not proper, but it’s work!) with hammer.

Cleaning time!

The carbon brushes seem at the dead end. Unfortunately, I did not found the perfect shape for the replacement, so, I modified from the alternator carbon brushes using file (I mean…a tools file) and small grits sand paper.

Need a patient booster…

Cut the middle of the old carbon brushes wire, and cut the new one exactly same length with the old one, soldering together, put back everything, fortunately, there is spring holder pin (red circle), important : Don’t forget to release it back after you Insert the rotor.

Polishing the commutator using small grits sand paper.

Check for the worn bearing, replace if need, mine like the new one!

Reinstall everthing, important : don’t forget to stake back the motor casing locking tab using chisel or other method, I believe it will go for another 150 000km and save your precious money from buying the new motor.

Honda Air-conditioner Blower Motor Run One Speed Only (Maximum Speed)

Posted in My Automotive Life | No Comments »

In my case, blower motor run  if  I select the maximum speed only from the climate control,  the maximum speed drive by relay (bypass), and the others speed controlled by either transistor (many variable speed)  or coils system (control 4 speed only),  that’s mean, the motor didn’t get the voltage supply from transistor/coils, the main suspect is either transistor/coils or before transistor/coils, my blower motor drive by transistor (mostly modern car use transistor to control the motor speed), enough for the theory, time to troubleshoot!

So, where is the location of transistor? Need to remove the glove box first (very easy task), here the suspect…unplug the socket, then remove two screw (green circle). This is of course you could get the new one, the whole set, but there a pricey…or maybe not available at the local shop, that why the term of DIY is exist.

Remove three screw at the front,

and others two at the back.

The last one inside the case (green circle). To remove thermo fuse, desoldering the blue circle terminal, to remove transistor, desoldering the red circle terminals. Wait! Don’t desoldering it yet, until we know the cause.

This is the main component of  blower motor transistor package, three of them, capacitor, thermo fuse and transistor. First to test is thermo fuse, firstly, detach one of the terminal from circuit (I prefer from the screw side). Check the continuity using multimeter or other method. In my case, there is no continuity, so that mean, this is one of the cause and the more important is, cheap replacement .  The complicated thing is to test the transistor.

To test the transistor, first we need the datasheet, this is the model of original transistor, brand : Toshiba, ID : 2SD1460, type : silicon NPN triple diffused type. And need to know a simple operation of transistor (you can ask uncle google). Make sure to identify the base (B), emitter (E) and collector (C) point.

A simple switching circuit to test an NPN transistor. If the transistor is OK the LED should light when the switch is pressed and not light when the switch is released. Source & details : http://electronicsclub.info/transistors.htm

This is a simple test I make using DC motor as output.

The old vs the new. Used equivalent transistor and thermo fuse.

Put some thermal compound to terminate air gap between transistor and heat sink, for more effective heat transfer.

Put everything back together.

At last, I shoot the trouble…